Category: 2017

Mixed Stock Analysis of Districts 106, 108 and 111 Sockeye

Sockeye runs from the Stikine and Taku rivers in Southeast Alaska are harvested in Canadian aboriginal, recreational, and commercial gillnet fisheries, and in US subsistence, personal use, and commercial gillnet fisheries. In the US, commercial gillnet fisheries in Districts 106 and 108 harvest wild stocks of sockeye salmon bound for Southeast Alaska island and mainland lakes, and for lakes and tributaries in the Stikine, Nass, and Skeena River drainages, while fisheries in District 111 harvest wild stocks of sockeye primarily bound for systems in the Taku River or to Crescent and Speel lakes in Alaska. Significant numbers of enhanced sockeye salmon bound for release sites in the Stikine and Taku rivers or to Snettisham Hatchery are also caught in these fisheries. Catches of Stikine and Taku river sockeye salmon stocks in Districts 106, 108 and 111 gillnet fisheries and the U.S. Stikine subsistence fishery are subject to a harvest sharing agreement outlined in Annex IV of the Pacific Salmon Treaty, in which the US is allowed 50% of the Total Allowable Catch of Stikine River and a variable proportion of Taku River sockeye salmon depending on the return of enhanced fish. Stock contribution estimates are critical to document compliance with the harvest sharing agreements, reconstruct runs of wild stocks, estimate the return of enhanced fish, forecast upcoming returns, and support sustainable management.
Genetic stock identification (GSI) is the preferred method for estimating stock contributions in fisheries in and near the Stikine and Taku rivers, and has been in use for transboundary management since 2011. GSI has improved estimates compared to past methods (scale pattern analysis), and is less logistically complex, less labor intensive, less expensive, more accurate, and delivers more timely results at a finer resolution.
This project has been conducting GSI analysis on sockeye salmon tissue samples collected from commercial gillnet fisheries in areas in and near the Stikine and Taku rivers in Southeast Alaska since 2012. The analysis will be focused on tissue samples collected in Districts 106, 108, and 111.

N18-I05 Mixed stock analysis of U.S. Districts 106, 108, and 111 sockeye salmon gillnet fisheries, 2018 Report

N17-I06 Mixed stock analysis of U.S. Districts 106, 108, and 111 sockeye salmon gillnet fisheries Report

N16-I06 Genetic Stock Identification of Districts 106, 108 and 111 Sockeye Report 2016

Transboundary Sockeye Thermal Mark Recovery (ADFG Mark, Tag & Age Lab Support)

The Thermal Mark Laboratory at the ADF&G Mark, Tag and Age (MTA) Laboratory is responsible for examining sockeye salmon otoliths recovered from commercial fisheries in southeast Alaska for thermal marks indicating hatchery origin, and for making the associated data available to biologists for management of sockeye from the transboundary Taku and Stikine Rivers.

N18-I02 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Mark, Tag, and Age Laboratory Support Report

N17-I03 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Mark, Tag, and Age Laboratory Support Report

N16-I16 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Mark, Tag, and Age Laboratory Support Report 2015-2016

N15-I23 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Mark, Tag and Age Laboratory Support. Year 2 of 3

N14-I37 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Mark, Tag and Age Laboratory Support. Year 1

 

 

Boundary Area Coho Escapement

The Hugh Smith Lake coho salmon population is substantially exploited by mixed-stock fisheries in both the U.S. and Canada and is, therefore, a key indicator stock used to monitor total adult abundance and escapements, and the pattern and intensity of exploitation by these fisheries on populations in the northern boundary area. It is the only system in the southern portion of Southeast Alaska where a total count (with back-up mark-recapture estimate) of coho salmon escapement has been routinely collected since 1982. Its location 70 km southeast of Ketchikan makes it a particularly strategic indicator stock for boundary area fisheries. It has also been one of three key indicator stocks used to measure the overall abundance of wild coho salmon available to the Alaska troll fishery and to measure the exploitation rate by the fishery.
Escapement projections are made from both the cumulative weir count and estimation models based on recovery of coded-wire tags to provide real-time information for management of fisheries for escapement. Peak helicopter survey counts at other Boundary Area streams provide an index with greater coverage that complements higher resolution assessment at Hugh Smith Lake.

N19-I04 Boundary Area Coho Escapement 2019 Report

N18-I03 Boundary Area Coho Escapement Report

N17-I04 Boundary Area Coho Escapement Report 2017

N16-I57 Boundary Area Coho Escapement Report 2016

 

Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon

This project, begun in 2012 by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife under the Sentinel Stocks Program to estimate the abundance of Chinook salmon spawners and effective breeders in the Snohomish River, continues today in partnership with the Tulalip Tribes of Washington using trans-generational genetic mark recapture (tGMR) and trans-generational rarefaction curve analysis (tRC). Additional objectives are to partition the genetic-based abundance estimate for natural spawning Chinook by origin, sex, and age, and assuming adequate data are acquired, and to develop a redd expansion calibration factor to adjust historical (or future) redd-based escapement estimates.
Funding is requested to collect and genotype subyearling offspring of the previous brood year, and to collect carcass samples from spawners in the fall. The Snohomish River basin is comprised of two Chinook salmon populations: the Skykomish River summer Chinook population (which includes Skykomish, mainstem Snohomish, and Pilchuck River) and the Snoqualmie River fall Chinook population. We expect to deliver tGMR and tRC abundance estimates for both populations for each brood year that is successfully sampled.

S18-VHP14B Skykomish River Juvenile Salmon Out-Migration Study 2018

S17-VHP21B Skykomish River juvenile salmon out-migration study

VHP16-02A Genetic-based abundance estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Report 2016

VHP15-05A Progress - Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon (WDFW Component)

VHP15-05B Progress - Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon (Tulalip Component)

SSP14-08 Progress - Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon. Year 4

SSP13-10 Progress - Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon. Year 3

SSP12-16 Progress - Genetic-Based Abundance Estimates for Snohomish River Chinook Salmon

Mixed stock analysis of districts 108 and 111 chinook fisheries

The Stikine and Taku rivers in Southeast Alaska (SEAK) support Chinook salmon runs important for various commercial, aboriginal, and recreational fisheries in both the United States (U.S.) and Canada. Included in these are U.S. commercial gillnet fisheries in Alaskan Districts 108 and 111, as well as sport fisheries near Wrangell, Petersburg, and Juneau. U.S. fisheries in these areas harvest stocks of Chinook salmon bound for SEAK and for tributaries in the transboundary Stikine and Taku rivers. Catches of Stikine and Taku river Chinook salmon stocks are subject to a harvest sharing agreement, in which the U.S. and Canada are each given an Allowable Catch specified by the Pacific Salmon Commission, and this relies on catch, escapement, recruitment information, and stock composition estimates to forecast indices of abundance. Until recently, stock composition of harvests was estimated primarily using coded-wire tags, which provided good estimates for marked stocks. However, expansions of these estimates could be uncertain due to a lack of coded-wire tags on all stocks contributing to the fishery, incomplete tagging of index stocks, and in some instances poor estimates of escapement or terminal run size. Genetic stock identification (GSI) provides a complementary set of accurate and reliable stock composition estimates necessary to meet the directives of abundance-based management of Chinook salmon, and is currently used to recalculate actual contributions of above-border Stikine and Taku Chinook salmon to the Districts 108 and 111 sport and commercial fisheries.

N18-VHP01 Mixed stock analysis of districts 108 and 111 chinook fisheries Report 2018

N17-VHP06 Mixed stock analysis of districts 108 and 111 chinook fisheries Report 2017

N16-I59 Mixed stock analysis of districts 108 and 111 chinook fisheries Report 2016

Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon Using Trans-generational Genetic Mark Recapture

The primary objective of this trans-generational genetic mark-recapture (tGMR) project is to: 1) estimate the abundance of Chinook salmon spawners and effective breeders in the Stillaguamish River above the smolt trap site using genetic abundance methods. The secondary objectives of this study are to: 2) estimate the natural spawning Chinook salmon abundance by origin (hatchery or natural), sex and age, and 3) estimate a redd expansion calibration factor from historic redd-based escapement estimates and possible future redd counts. The data collected for this project also provide a genetic baseline for these population estimates, a genetic (parentage-based) estimate of the proportion of hatchery-origin spawners, and an estimate of relative reproductive success of hatchery spawners, because carcasses are classified by origin. Genetic sampling will be conducted during the fall spawning period, and smolt trapping will be conducted during the following spring.

S19-I08 Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture 2019 Report

S18-VHP12 Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture

S17-VHP17 2016 Broodyear Report Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture

VHP16-01: Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture 2015-2016

VHP15-06 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon Using Trans-generational Genetic Mark Recapture. Year 1

SSP14-05 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon. Year 5

SSP13-11 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon. Year 4

 

 

Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, Alaska

The overarching goal of this joint project by the University of Alaska and the Alaska Department of Fish & Game is to use parentage-based tagging over three generations of experimental hatchery supplementation to quantify differences in fitness between wild and hatchery-origin sockeye salmon in Auke Creek, Alaska. Secondary goals of this research are to test for second-generation differences in fitness between wild and hatchery-origin individuals that spawn naturally, and to quantify changes in genetic diversity and population structure in the wild sockeye salmon population as a result of three generations of hatchery supplementation. Results of this study will provide information critical for assessing the relative costs and benefits of hatchery supplementation in managing sockeye salmon populations subject to the Pacific Salmon Treaty.

N19-I11B Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK 2019 Report

N18-I08B Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK Report 2018

N17-I10A Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK Report 2018

N16-I15A Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye in Auke Creek, AK June 2014-June 2017

N15-I22A Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK. (UAF Component) Year 2 of 3

N15-I22B Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK. (ADFG Component) Year 2 of 3

N14-I34A Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK. (UAF Component) Year 1

N14-I34B Assessing Effects of Supplementation on Fitness of Sockeye Salmon in Auke Creek, AK. (ADFG Component) Year 1

 

 

Atnarko River Chinook Escapement Estimation

The Atnarko River was identified as a potential escapement and exploitation rate indicator for Central BC early summer Chinook, and in 2009 the Atnarko River Chinook stock was proposed as an exploitation rate indicator. It was funded under the Coded Wire Tag (CWT) Improvement program, and the purpose of the five-year mark-recapture program was to improve escapement estimates for early summer Chinook.
Since then, the program has met the data standard of a coefficient of variation (CV) of 15% or less. Continued mark-recapture estimates on the Atnarko River will build on the information thus far. The project will estimate the escapement of Chinook salmon and generate estimates such that the fraction of CWT fish is known relative to the wild and/or unmarked escapement, and this data is essential for Chinook run reconstruction calculations. This program is part of a comprehensive group of programs on Atnarko River Chinook salmon that includes the production of Chinook fry and CWT application (under separate submission to the Northern Fund) and terminal fishery monitoring.

N18-VHP12 Atnarko River Chinook Salmon Spawning Escapement Estimation Final 2018

N17-VHP05 Atnarko River Chinook Salmon Spawning Escapement Estimation Report 2017

N16-I30 Atnarko River Chinook Escapement Estimation Report 2016. Year 3

N15-I33 Atnarko River Chinook Escapement Estimation 2015. Year 2

N14-I33 Atnarko River Chinook Escapement Estimation 2014. Year 1

Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction

Weir counts have been made on the Klukshu River, part of the Alsek River system, by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) in co-operation with the Champagne-Aishihik First Nation, since 1976. A mark-and-recapture program ran from 2000 to 2004, and in 2005 and 2006, the Alsek sockeye population was estimated using tissue sample and catch information from the commercial sockeye fishery in Dry Bay as well as the weir counts. By recommendation by the Northern Fund Committee in 2008, a statistically valid sampling strategy that would provide the foundation for reconstructing sockeye and Chinook returns to the Alsek River was completed. Based on this model, it was proposed that funding be provided to analyze sockeye tissue samples collected in the commercial sockeye fishery in Dry Bay (up to 750 per season), to reconstruct the Alsek sockeye runs as described in Gazey’s analysis.

N20-I23 Alsek River Sockeye Salmon Run Reconstruction Using GSI 2020 Report

N18-I14 Alsek River Sockeye Run Reconstruction Using GSI 2018 Report

N17-I16 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction 2017

N16-I49 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction Using GSI 2016

N15-I11 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction 2015. Year 4

N14-I10 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction 2014

N13-I12 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction 2013

N12-I17 Alsek Sockeye Run Reconstruction, 2012

 

 

Annual Run Reconstruction Northern Boundary Area Sockeye

The Northern Boundary Technical Committee’s (NBTC) northern boundary area sockeye reconstruction assessments program has been conducted annually since the mid 1990’s to provide bilaterally agreed data on the sockeye stock composition and escapement for Nass, Skeena, Macdonald, and other US sockeye stocks originating in the northern boundary area.
The key components of the program include: 1) acquiring sockeye escapement, catch and stock composition data from Alaskan and Canadian northern boundary areas, 2) updating databases and providing initial model runs, 3) facilitating the NBTC workshop to provide the bilaterally agreed outcomes on the stock specific abundances 4) provide a report on the final agreed outcomes.

N17-I24 Annual Run Reconstruction Northern Boundary Sockeye Interim Presentation