Category: 2010

Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon Using Trans-generational Genetic Mark Recapture

The primary objective of this trans-generational genetic mark-recapture (tGMR) project is to: 1) estimate the abundance of Chinook salmon spawners and effective breeders in the Stillaguamish River above the smolt trap site using genetic abundance methods. The secondary objectives of this study are to: 2) estimate the natural spawning Chinook salmon abundance by origin (hatchery or natural), sex and age, and 3) estimate a redd expansion calibration factor from historic redd-based escapement estimates and possible future redd counts. The data collected for this project also provide a genetic baseline for these population estimates, a genetic (parentage-based) estimate of the proportion of hatchery-origin spawners, and an estimate of relative reproductive success of hatchery spawners, because carcasses are classified by origin. Genetic sampling will be conducted during the fall spawning period, and smolt trapping will be conducted during the following spring.

S19-I08 Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture 2019 Report

S18-VHP12 Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture

S17-VHP17 2016 Broodyear Report Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture

VHP16-01: Abundance estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook salmon using trans-generational genetic mark recapture 2015-2016

VHP15-06 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon Using Trans-generational Genetic Mark Recapture. Year 1

SSP14-05 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon. Year 5

SSP13-11 Abundance Estimates for Stillaguamish River Chinook Salmon. Year 4

 

 

Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification

Provisions of the Pacific Salmon Treaty specify harvest sharing arrangements of Nass and Skeena River sockeye salmon returns for the U.S. and Canada. The United States is allowed to harvest a fixed percentage of the Annual Allowable Harvest of Nass and Skeena sockeye stocks in Alaska’s District 101 gillnet and District 104 purse seine fisheries. Accurate estimates of the stock-specific catch in commercial fisheries of each nation are required to estimate the total return of these stocks and the percentage of each stock caught in treaty-limited fisheries. Annual catches over or under the agreed percentage are made up for in subsequent years.

Until recently, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) used scale pattern analysis successfully to estimate contributions of Nass, Skeena and Southeast Alaska sockeye stocks to fisheries in southern Southeast Alaska. Since  2006, the Auke Bay Laboratories has used genetic analysis for the Northern Boundary sockeye fisheries. Results from comparisons between stock composition using scales and genetic analysis show both methods provide accurate estimates of stock composition, although DNA analysis is able to discriminate stocks at a finer resolution than scales. An additional advantage of the DNA technique is that it does not require annual sampling to re-establish the escapement baseline.

The purpose of this project is to continue the genetic stock identification of the commercial sockeye catch in ADF&G District 101 gillnet fishery and District 104 seine fishery using the baselines developed by the ADF&G.

N18-I10 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification Report 2018

N17-I09 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification Report 2017

N16-I02 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification Report 2016

N15-I02 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification for 2015. Year 9 of 17

N14-I02 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification for 2014. Year 8

N13-I02 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification for 2013. Year 7

N12-I07 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Stock Identification for 2012. Year 6

N11-I04 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification. Year 5

N10-I11 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification. Year 3

N08-I30 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification. Year 3

N07-I19 Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Genetic Stock Identification. Year 2.

N06-I12A Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification

N06-I12B Northern Boundary Area Sockeye Salmon Genetic Stock Identification (ADFG)

Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling

Provisions of the 1999 Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST) specify abundance-based harvest sharing arrangements of Nass and Skeena River sockeye salmon returns for the U.S. and Canada. The United States is allowed to harvest a fixed percentage of the annual allowable harvest of Nass and Skeena sockeye stocks in Alaska’s District 101 gillnet and District 104 purse seine fisheries. Accurate estimates of the stock-specific catch in commercial fisheries of each nation are required to estimate the total return of these stocks and the percentage of each stock caught in treaty-limited fisheries.
Since 1982, scale pattern analysis (SPA), sometimes in conjunction with other biological markers, has been used to survey the weekly catch of Northern Boundary and Transboundary sockeye salmon stocks in Southeast Alaska fisheries. However, problems in accurately estimating stock-specific catches and total returns of sockeye salmon in the early years of the Pacific Salmon Treaty resulted in an extensive investigation, and it was concluded that improved stock identification techniques, such as genetic stock analysis, were needed to accurately evaluate effectiveness and improve, if possible, existing run reconstruction methods. Two blind tests of scale analysis vs. genetic analysis demonstrated that, while both techniques were accurate, the genetic analysis had higher precision and could also often identify many specific stocks, while scale analysis is limited to identifying a few stock-groups. Neither technique can identify enhanced fish where the brood stock came from wild stocks that are also present in the mixed stock fisheries; thus, otoliths are used in annual stock composition estimates and run reconstructions.
ADF&G proposes to continue collecting weekly otolith, tissue, and scale samples of sockeye from the Southeast Alaska commercial harvest in the District 101 gillnet and District 104 purse seine fisheries, among other districts and fisheries for projects that complement this program. Stock identification analysis using age composition, thermal mark presence, and new, more stock-discrete DNA techniques will be conducted at NOAA’s Auke Bay Laboratory. This project also complements the continuing work by DFO in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

N18-I06 Northern & Transboundary Sockeye Salmon Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling Report

N17-I07 Northern & Transboundary Sockeye Salmon Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling Report

N16-I05 Northern & Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 9

N15-I08 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 8

N14-I07 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 7

N13-I07 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 6

N12-I05 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 5

N11-I13 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 4

N10-I10 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 3

N08-I12 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling. Year 2

N07-I25 Northern and Transboundary Sockeye Salmon Matched Scale-Tissue Sampling

 

South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation

Continue to develop, culture, and implement a captive adult broodstock program using juvenile Chinook recruited from the South Fork of the Nooksack River. This is accomplished by receiving up to 1,000 juvenile fish from the Skookum Creek facility, identifying them as either yearling or sub yearling and placing them in discrete vessels for rearing. Additional work includes passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging and subsequent transfer of half of the fish to the NOAA facility at Manchester for extended rearing in saltwater, while the other half remains at Kendall Creek Hatchery. During the summer months developing adults are identified for maturation and then transferred to the Skookum Hatchery for spawning. The resultant eggs and fry are then incubated, reared, and released into the South Fork of the Nooksack River in the spring of the following year.

The 12 months of staff funding is to support the increasing burden and complexity of fish culture, DNA sampling, PIT tagging, fish health monitoring, data entry, tracking and enumeration and technical reports associated with the program.

S16-E01 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation. Year 9

S15-E01 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation. Year 8 of 10

S14-E01 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation. Year 7

S13-E01 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation. Year 6

S12-E02 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Brood Implementation. Year 5

S11-E01 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Brood Implementation. Year 4

S10-E02 South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation. Year 3

 

 

 

Skeena lakes juvenile sockeye hydroacoustic surveys

We propose to use hydroacoustic methodology combined with trawl and gillnet sampling to estimate the limnetic fish species composition in six Skeena River and Nass River watersheds lakes and to estimate the population and rearing densities of age-0 sockeye fry and competitor limnetic species at each surveyed lake. The sockeye trawl and gillnet samples will also provide age and size data for the juvenile sockeye population at each lake.

Sockeye originating from the selected lakes are harvested in both Canadian and American fisheries, and thus relevant to the Pacific Salmon Treaty. Hydroacoustic surveys are a cost effective method for assessing the status of sockeye stocks. Adult escapements for many BC north coast sockeye lakes are currently not determined due to high costs from the remoteness of the lake or due to other factors such as poor visibility for assessing lake spawners. The hydroacoustic methodology allows for a quick and accurate assessment of the stock status of each surveyed lake. For lakes where reliable estimates of adult escapement are available, hydroacoustic fry surveys are useful for quantifying spawner-to-fry productivity. Finally, the estimates of age-0 sockeye fry population can be compared to the lake carrying capacity for each lake.

N20-I45 Skeena/Nass Sockeye Lakes Hydroacoustic Surveys 2020 Report

N19-I43 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Hydroacoustic Surveys 2019 Report

N18-I34 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Hydroacoustic Surveys Report 2018

N17-I32 Skeena Sockeye Lakes hydroacoustic surveys 2017

N16-I09 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Hydroacoustic Surveys Report Year 4 0f 5

N15-I16 2015 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Hydroacoustic Surveys. Year 3 of 5

N14-I14 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Juvenile Sockeye Hydroacoustic Surveys. Year 2 of 5

N13-I20 Skeena Sockeye Lakes Juvenile Sockeye Hydroacoustic Surveys. Year 1 of 5

 

Lower Skeena River Recreational Creel Survey

The main objective of this project is to provide monthly catch estimates for all salmon species in the sport fishery on the waters of the Skeena River (downstream of Terrace), with special emphasis on the Chinook catch estimate. Additional objectives include recording the incidence of adipose fin clips of Chinook and Coho such that awareness factors for the expansion of voluntary CWT head submissions may be developed and the collection of DNA and age data of Chinook salmon.

N20-I47 Lower Skeena River Angling Creel Survey 2020 Report

N19-I45 Lower Skeena River Angling Creel Survey 2019 Report

N16-I14 Lower Skeena River Chinook Creel Survey Report 2016

N15-I21 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2015.

N14-I28 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2014.

N13-I08 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2013.

N12-I10 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2012.

N11-I16 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2011.

N10-I01 Skeena River Recreational Chinook Creel Survey 2010.

 

 

Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection

Collection of genetic stock identification samples from lower Stikine and Taku river commercial fisheries for eventual determination of reliable post-season estimates of the stock compositions for Chinook and sockeye in the lower Stikine and Taku in-river commercial fisheries.

The project will also provide information to assess the run timing of various stocks or stock groupings through the inriver fisheries on the Stikine and Taku rivers.

N15-I07 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection, 2015. Year 7

N14-I06 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection, 2014. Year 6

N13-I06 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection, 2013. Year 5

N12-I02 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection, 2012. Year 4

N11-I11 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection

N10-I14 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Inriver Fisheries – Sample Collection

N08-I02 Stock Composition of Stikine and Taku Chinook and Sockeye In-river Fisheries

 

Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation

Coho salmon returning to the Taku River pass through an offshore troll fishery before entering inside waters where they encounter seine, drift gillnet, and recreational fisheries. After entering the river, the remaining coho salmon encounter drift/set gillnet fisheries in Canada. Such a resource is worthy of a stock assessment program that directly estimates production parameters such as harvest, escapement, exploitation rate, smolt production, survival rates and brood year production. This project will provide annual estimates of escapement necessary to refine escapement goals and forecast runs. Improved escapement goals and run forecasts along with inseason abundance estimates allow implementation of abundance-based management. These combined efforts in-river along with adult sampling programs in the various marine fisheries allow detailed stock assessment analyses.

2019 N15-I04B Taku River Coho Adult Augmentation Report

2019 N15-I05A Taku River Coho Smolt Tagging Augmentation 2019 Report

2018 - N15-I04B Taku River Coho Adult Augmentation Report

2018 - N15-I05A Taku River Coho Salmon Smolt Tagging Augmentation Report

N17-I21A Taku River Coho Adult Augmentation - Final

N17-I22 Taku River Coho Smolt Tagging Augmentation - Final

N16-I44B Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Adult Augmentation Report. Year 10

N16-I45B Taku River Coho Salmon Smolt Tagging Augmentation Report. Year 10

N15-I04A Taku River Coho Salmon Adult Tagging Augmentation. Year 9 (DFO Component)

N15-I04B Taku River Coho Adult Augmentation 2015-2017. Years 9-11 (ADFG Component)

N15-I05B Taku River Coho Salmon Smolt Tagging Augmentation. Year 9 (DFO Component)

N14-I04 Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation. Year 8

N13-I04 Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation. Year 7

N12-I09 Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation, 2012. Year 6

N11-I09A Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation (ADFG Component), 2011

N11-I09B Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation (DFO Component)

N10-I15 Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation (DFO Component)

N06-I08A Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation

N06-I08B Taku River Coho Salmon Escapement and Smolt Tagging Augmentation

Stikine River Coded Wire Tagging of Chinook and Coho Salmon Smolts

Funding of this proposal will augment the existing joint Canada and US coded wire tagging programme and serve to provide the resources to meet the Stikine River chinook and coho salmon smolts tagging objectives. The data derived will be used to determine the distribution, run timing, marine survival, and magnitude of marine catches of adult Stikine River chinook salmon, and distribution and run timing adult Stikine River coho salmon. This project is directly linked to the requirement in Annex IV, Chapter 1, paragraph 3(a)(2&3) of the PST to develop and implement abundance-based management regimes for Stikine chinook and coho salmon.

N19-I18 Stikine River Coded Wire Tagging 2019 Report

N18-VHP04 Stikine Coded Wire Tagging Report 2018

N17-VHP09 Stikine River Coded Wire Tagging Augmentation 2017. Year 10

N16-I03 Stikine River Coded Wire Tag Augmentation 2016. Year 9

N15-I03 Stikine River Coded Wire Tag Augmentation, 2015. Year 8

N14-I03 Stikine River Coded Wire Tag Augmentation, 2014. Year 7

N13-I03 Stikine River Coded Wire Tag Augmentation, 2013. Year 6

N12-I03 Stikine River CWT Augmentation, 2012

N11-I07 Stikine River CWT Augmentation 2011

N10-I05 Stikine River CWT Augmentation 2010

N08-I37 Stikine River CWT Augmentation 2008

N07-I15 Stikine River CWT Augmentation 2007

N06-I16 Stikine River CWT Augmentation 2006

Forecasting Southeast Alaska pink salmon harvest from juvenile salmon data: extension of models

The Southeast Coastal Monitoring project has conducted monthly sampling surveys to collect data associated with juvenile salmon as they pass through migration corridors to the Gulf of Alaska. These surveys are conducted from May to August after the high-mortality periods of both freshwater incubation and early marine nearshore residency, and provide information on year-class strength that can be used with associated environmental data to forecast abundance of the returning adult salmon in subsequent years. Pink salmon catch data from these annual surveys have been used to develop models that predicted SEAK pink salmon harvests.

N12-I01 Forecasting Southeast Alaska Pink Salmon Harvest from Juvenile Salmon Data: Extension of Models. Year 5

N11-I03 Forecasting Southeast Alaska Pink Salmon Harvest from Juvenile Salmon Data: Extension of Models. Year 4

N10-I03 Forecasting Southeast Alaska Pink Salmon Harvest from Juvenile Salmon Data: Extension of Models