All posts by John Son

Salish Sea Marine Survival Project

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project leverages human and financial resources from the United States and Canada to determine the primary factors affecting the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the Salish Sea. It is the largest and most important research of its kind in the shared waters of British Columbia and Washington State, addressing a key uncertainty impeding salmon recovery and sustainable fisheries. The project will, for the first time, undertake a comprehensive study of the physical, chemical and biological factors impacting salmon survival, in order to improve our collective understanding of salmon in saltwater, facilitating smarter management and stronger returns.

Over 60 organizations, representing diverse philosophies and encompassing most of the region’s fisheries and marine research and management complex, are working together on this massive transboundary effort. And, the Pacific Salmon Foundation (PSF) and Long Live the Kings (LLTK) are coordinating it.

New Joint Transboundary Technical Committee Reports

The following reports are now available:

Pacific Salmon Commission Joint Transboundary Technical Committee. Final Estimates of Transboundary River Salmon Production, Harvest and Escapement and a Review of Joint Enhancement Activities in 2014.  TCTR(17)-1.

 

Pacific Salmon Commission Joint Transboundary Technical Committee. Final Estimates of Transboundary River Salmon Production, Harvest and Escapement and a Review of Joint Enhancement Activities in 2015.  TCTR(17)-2.

South Fork Nooksack Chinook Captive Broodstock Implementation

Continue to develop, culture, and implement a captive adult broodstock program using juvenile Chinook recruited from the South Fork of the Nooksack River. This is accomplished by receiving up to 1,000 juvenile fish from the Skookum Creek facility, identifying them as either yearling or sub yearling and placing them in discrete vessels for rearing. Additional work includes passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging and subsequent transfer of half of the fish to the NOAA facility at Manchester for extended rearing in saltwater, while the other half remains at Kendall Creek Hatchery. During the summer months developing adults are identified for maturation and then transferred to the Skookum Hatchery for spawning. The resultant eggs and fry are then incubated, reared, and released into the South Fork of the Nooksack River in the spring of the following year.

The 12 months of staff funding is to support the increasing burden and complexity of fish culture, DNA sampling, PIT tagging, fish health monitoring, data entry, tracking and enumeration and technical reports associated with the program.

 

 

 

Refining & standardizing Nass area chum salmon stock assessment 2014

Current methodology for estimating escapement and run size of Nass Area Chum salmon relies on a number of untested assumptions, resulting in considerable uncertainty regarding stock status. We propose a detailed review of recent and historical escapement data for Nass Area Chum salmon stocks, combined with strategically targeted escapement surveys, to refine and standardize the methodology used to calculate Nass Area Chum salmon escapement and run size.